Fakes of Russian propaganda – 2

Radio Svoboda continues to survey how Russian media and individual social media users manipulate the public opinion by pretending that photographs and footage from various places all over the globe come from the Ukrainian events. The compilation was prepared by Ihor Losyk.  Continue reading

Introduction to peaceful reality. Military correspondent Babchenko on the situation in Slovyansk and life after war

Journalist Arkadiy Babchenko is one of the few colleagues from Russia who is trying to make sense of the situation in the East of Ukraine. Really make sense of it. He is not putting labels, he does not tolerate official definitions and he does not shy away from posing uncomfortable questions, which he is not scared to get a black eye for.

Babchenko is outside of official journalism. His work is his personal blog “Journalism without mediators,” which exists thanks to charitable donations of the readers. For many his blog has become as “coordinate system” of sorts. For others, an excuse to call him a national traitor.  Continue reading

Does Taking Russian TV off the Air in Ukraine Qualify as Censorship?

By Iryna Chulivska (Institute for Mass Information) for Ukrainska Pravda, March 24, 2014

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Photo caption: Dmitry Kiselev: “Veterans are burned alive during the Liberation Day in Kherson.”

Working for a journalist human rights organization, I frequently have to face the facts of censorship. We collect data on instances of censorship and talk with journalists who fell victim to it, so we decided, instead of keeping quiet, to track this phenomenon by monitoring mass media. Thus, my familiarity with censorship extends beyond reading Wikipedia.

When talks emerged about the possibility of taking Russian TV channels off the air on the territory of Ukraine, some Western politicians took this as censorship. If one does not look any further, it may indeed appear, at first glance, that such a step amounts to encroachment on the freedom of speech.

But there is one “but.” Continue reading