For Putin, peace in Donbas is a catastrophe

That the Kremlin called the peace plan of the Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko “an ultimatum” was probably not surprising for the head of state himself and for international observers. Poroshenko really did propose a peace plan, which is aimed to normalise the situation in Donbas and find ways to develop the region within the state of Ukraine. But Russia does not need a peace plan. And Russia does not need consultations between the Ukrainian government and the legitimate government of Donbas. And Russia definitely does not need early elections to the local government bodies in Donbas – for it, that would be a catastrophe. Russia needs the Ukrainian President to hold talks with those that had been appointed by the Administration of the Russian President to “represent” the citizens of Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts – Pushilin, Gubarev, Bolotov and other cheats.  Continue reading

“Voluntarism” 2.0 

Yuriy Fedorov

Loss in war frequently leads to revolutions and other political perturbations. Russia’s war against Ukraine is not over yet, however Putin’s foreign political fiasco is obvious. The issue is how it will end for him and his regime. What happened is what the Kremlin was trying to avoid: the strategy or separating the US and Europe failed, which was considered necessary for achieving the more or less sacred goal – building some multi-polar world. Regardless of the contradictions regarding concrete means of counteraction to Moscow’s expansion, the Western countries are united in that this expansion has to be stopped.  Continue reading

Russia intends to ban the usage of foreign words in public spread of information

Russia continues to come up with new ways to maximally limit the freedoms of citizens, for the residents of the country to do and even talk only what the “Tsar” consents to.

The State Duma Committee for Culture recommended to the chamber to pass the first draft of the bill regarding fines for the ungrounded use of foreign words in cases of public spread of information in the state language.

It is expected that the members of the Parliament will propose to the State Duma council to include the condiment to the agenda of the plenary session on July 1st. “The bill may be passed in its first draft with additional work for the second draft, including any wishes,” says the conclusion of the committee, signed by its head Stanislav Govorukhin.  Continue reading

The meaning behind Poroshenko’s “Peace Plan”

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President Petro Poroshenko

By Taras Klochko, Espreso TV, June 18, 2014

All the peace-loving statements voiced by President Petro Poroshenko have image-making as their primary goal. It is highly unlikely that the president seriously expects to implement his peace plan.

From the first days of his presidency, Poroshenko has constantly stressed the need for a peaceful settlement through negotiations of the situation in the East. Already in his inaugural speech, Poroshenko presented the “presidential peace plan” whose essence is quite simple: a ceasefire, amnesty for terrorists who have not committed serious crimes, and negotiations, but certainly not with terrorists like Girkin or Bolotov, but with “influential people in the East” who are ready to establish order. Continue reading

The unsinkable member of the “Ozero” cooperative

The head of the Russian Railways Vladimir Yakunin will remain on his post for three more years. 

The head of the JSC “Russian Railways” Vladimir Yakunin will remain on his post for three more years. The term of Yakunin’s contract has run out earlier, however, according to mass media, Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev intends to extend it. Vladimir Yakunin’s figure has been recently under a lot of discussion by the press thanks to the anti-corruption investigations by opposition activists. The most well-know are “The Winter Olympics in the Sub-Tropics” by Boris Nemtsov and Leonid Martyniuk and the investigation of Alexey Navalniy’s Anti-Corruption Fund, which directly deal with Yakunin’s revenues and property.  Continue reading

“Closeness to the Kremlin is a source of wealth.” 

The hard luck of the book about Vladimir Putin’s regime: the university publishing house fears plaints on part of the Russian government. 

The Cambridge University publishing house refused to publish the book of its long-term author Karen Dawisha called “Putin’s Kleptocracy: Whom Does Russia Belong To?” The publishers do not doubt the reliability of the investigator, however they fear possible court plaints on part of the Russian government.  Continue reading

The country of Blitzkrieg and hysteria: how to talk to Russian crazies

The Russian-Ukrainian talks regarding gas with the mediation of the EU Commission ended with what they should have ended with – Stockholm arbitrage and the demand to make advance payments for gas. And this is a logical consequences of the approach to politics and economics that Putin’s Kremlin preaches. 
Continue reading

Russian blogger: The rude song about Putin is a development of the Pentagon’s political technologists

You know what I think about the rude song about Putin (“Putin – h***lo, la-la-la”), which they are actively trying to present in the Ukrainian segment of the Russian-language Internet as a national song of Ukraine?

This is no national song. It is most likely to be a secret development of American political technologists from the Pentagon. And it was created to zombify the population… no, not of Ukraine, but of RUSSIA! By means of constant repetition, the Russians are being subconsciously coerced into thinking that “Putin is (insert rude word).” As is known, if a person is constantly told that they are a swine, sooner or later they will start behaving like one. Continue reading

Mystical Body

Andrey Piontkovskiy

Mother Theresa could fairly reproach the Ukrainian soldiers for many things. During the shootings of the positions of the separatists/federalists/rebels/terrorists, which the latter frequently intentionally set up in living quarters, local citizens perish as well. The Ukrainian state is facing a horrible dilemma: to allow professional saboteurs, trucks sent from the neighbouring country, to start disorders, steal, attack the border checkpoints, kidnap, torture and kill Ukrainian citizens only for remaining faithful to their country, or to try and neutralise these “desperate” (according to Lavrov) separatists/federalists/rebels/terrorists, thus possibly endangering the lives of peaceful civilians. It was this that the main organiser and inspiration to “force Ukraine into friendship” Mr. Putin prophesied and warned during his first “Ukrainian” press conference about: “Let them try to shoot at our soldiers, when there are women and children standing in front of them.”  Continue reading